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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Eric Schmidt
Executive Chairman of Google
CNBC 09/25/2013
First place, with the FISA courts we're not allowed to discuss it and the law is clear. We can't talk about it. There were other allegations, for example, that the NSA had a direct connection to Google. Those were all false. We actually looked to make sure that isn't true. If they had one, it would be illegal and I'm sure they don't.
Eric Schmidt
CEO Google
CNBC 09/25/2013
Schmidt: The NSA claims it's doing what the law says. Seems to me if the NSA is watching that amount of domestic material, we really gotta wonder if that's the broad mission. We don't really know if all the Snowden revelations are true. But if they are true, the NSA has been watching an awful lot of activity on the internet. What Google has asked, is we want to legally tell you how much the FISA courts ask us for information. We can't even legally answer that question. I think we would be stronger as a country with more transparency about what we're doing. I really believe that. I disagree with the security folks who say, we can't tell that. They already know. What we really want… We're stronger when people know what's going on and they're helping us make it better.
Eric Schmidt
CEO Google
CNBC 09/25/2013
Schmidt: First place, with the FISA courts we're not allowed to discuss it and the law is very clear. We can't talk about it. There were other allegations, for example, that the NSA had a direct connection to Google. Those were all false. We’ve actually looked to make sure that isn't true. If they had one, it would be illegal and I'm sure they don't.
Eric Schmidt
Executive Chairman and CEO of Google
CNNW 11/04/2013
Schmidt: it's just terrible policy. So as an example, in the Uunited States, it appears as though, according to the documents, that the National Security Agency tracked everyone's phone calls in order to identify 300 suspects. We had to track according to the disclosures, 300 million people's activities. It doesn't seem right. Seems like overreach. Over and over again this needs to be organized. There are legitimate uses of this. This is clearly an over step. In this particular case, we assume that there was monitoring between different computer systems. With encryption, we can stop that. Stout: Google is calling this overreach. You're clearly angry about this. Schmidt: We are.
Eric Schmidt quoted
CEO Google
KQED 11/05/2013
Herera: One big tech executive speaking out against speaking atalligations of spying into corporate databases by the National Security Agency. Google's executive chairman, Eric Schmidt, said that widespread U.S. government spying by the NSA on the company's data centers, if true, would be outragous and potentiall illegal. Schmidt told a Hong Cong newspaper that his company has registered complaints with the NSA, President Obama and Congress.
Eric Schmidt quoted
Executive Chairman of Google
CNBC 11/26/2013
Mathison: Google's Eric Schmidt saying they're stepping up the security efforts at Google, saying, and this was an incredible statement to me, “what i can tell you is now that we're safe from the Chinese and the NSA.”
Eric Schmidt
Executive Chairman of Google
FOXNEWSW 12/04/2013
Schmidt: Really outrageous that the National Security Agency was looking between the google data centers. if that's true, the steps the organization was willing to do without good judgment to pursue it’s mission and potentially violate people's privacy is not okay. It’s just not OK.
Eric Schmidt
Executive Chairman of Google
FBC 09/24/2014
Bartiromo: Is Edward Snowden, is he a hero do you think or is he a criminal? Schmidt: Well we spent a lot of time looking at what he did and it was helpful that we found that out, but we don't want to endorse bulk leaking. Because we don't want random people taking large amounts of data and making those public to the world. So I don’t think it’s a good idea in general. However, the revelations from Snowden showed us that the NSA had at least exceeded it’s initial mandate and Google has aggressively protected itself. We now use encryption for our data both at rest and in all the connections inbetween the computers so your information is the safest it could ever be on Google servers. Bartiromo: And when it comes to healthcare information the stakes are even that much higher. Schmidt: For the same reason. Bartiromo: For the same reason. Schmidt: But imagine again, the reason you wouldn’t want bulk leaking, is you can imagine some evil person taking personal health care records and illegally leaking all that to hurt people. You just don't want to encourage that.
Eric Schmidt
Executive Chairman of Google
FBC 09/24/2014
Thiel: There’s always this difficult issue, we have a terrorism problem, we have a national security problem and so I do think that it's very important for us to be doing things, things about this. And my criticism of the NSA is not that they’re collected all this data, but they really don't seem to know what they're doing with it. Bartiromo: Do we know what we're doing with all this data? Schmidt: Well, the NSA doesn’t talk to us. So you’d have to ask the NSA. The current evidence is that the NSA data collection was not misused to violate the citizens of America, which would be illegal. However many of us expressed concerns that it could be misused.
Eric Schmidt
Executive Chairman of Google
CSPAN 12/12/2014
Schmidt: There's been damage sort of at many levels. Let's start by saying that if you're a European right now you're less likely to trust an American firm to retain your data. Maybe you should always be less likely but now as a result of these revelations you're less likely. As a company what Google is we massively encrypted our internal systems using encryption that is 2048 bit long and for the nontechnical I'll just describe that 2048 is much larger than the original 1024, not twice as big, it’s many, many times bigger. It's generally viewed that this level of encryption is unbreakable in our lifetimes by any sets of human beings in any way. We'll see if that's really true. But I today believe that if you have important information the safest place to keep it is in Google.
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